Best Leave Application Tips for Hong Kong Public Holiday in 2022

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The coming year of 2022 will be more or less a setback for most of the employees, because there are 3 holidays on Saturday, such as New Year’s Day on January 1st, the day following Good Friday on April 16th and National Day on October 1st, none of which are set compensation leaves. Nevertheless, there will be many public holidays on Sunday, which means their compensation leaves will be set on Monday, and it’s a good opportunity for a short trip. What a good day for employees and bad day for employers!

Many small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) said that although the coming of holidays has little impact on costs, various industries often face a shortage of manpower, especially in the catering and tourism industries, where replacements are difficult to find and shops are closed due to manpower problems. In this article, employers can learn more about the 2022 public holidays and make early plans.

1. Christmas Day + New Year’s Day 

Christmas Day (December 25th) and New Year’s Day (January 1st) are both on Saturdays, which seems like 2 days are missing, but December 27th (Mon.) is a compensation leave after Christmas. If you want to take a long holiday, you might consider taking a leave from Tuesday to Friday to make your own 9-day holiday.

2. Lunar New Year 

The first to the third day of the Lunar New Year are from February 1st to 3rd, that is, from Tuesday to Thursday. As long as you ask for leave on January 31st (Mon.) and February 4th (Fri.), you can connect with the previous and subsequent weekends and make your own 9-day holiday.

3. Ching Ming Festival

Ching Ming Festival is April 5th (Tue.). If you ask for leave on April 4th, then you can start 4 consecutive days in one go from April 2nd (Sat.).

4. Easter

April 15th (Fri.) , i.e. Good Friday, April 16th (Sat.), i.e. the day following Good Friday, April 17th (Sun.), and April 18th (Mon.) i.e. Easter Monday. The holidays are surrounded by Sundays to easily create a 4-day holiday.

5. Labour Day 

Labour Day is on Sunday, so the next day, May 2nd (Mon.), is set as compensation leave, which means everyone can take a holiday for 3 consecutive days in this case.

 

6. Buddha’s Birthday 

Similarly, the Buddha’s birthday is also on Sunday, so the next day, May 9th (Mon.), will be set as compensation leave, which means everyone can take a holiday for 3 consecutive days in this case.

7. Tuen Ng Festival

The Tuen Ng Festival is on June 3rd (Fri.), and everyone can have a holiday in conjunction with Saturday and Sunday.

8. Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Establishment Day 

Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Establishment Day is on July 1st (Fri.), and everyone can have a holiday in conjunction with Saturday and Sunday.

9. The second day following the Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival

The second day following the Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival falls on September 11th (Sun.), so the next day will be a compensation leave. In this case, September 10th(Sat.), September 11th (Sun.), and September 12th (Mon.) are available for 3 consecutive days.

10. Chung Yeung Festival 

Although National Day falls on October 1st (Sat.) and cannot make up the holiday, the Chung Yeung Festival is on October 4th (Tue.). You only need to ask for leave on October 3rd (Mon.) and you can take 4 days off in one go.

11. Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day in 2023

Employees can have holidays from December 24th (Sat.) to December 27th (Tue.), and from December 31st (Sat.) to January 2nd (Mon.), 2023.

Now employees only need to ask for leaves on December 28th (Wed.), December 29th (Thu.), and December 30th (Fri.) to release 10 days in one go!

The time of public holidays varies from year to year. As a dedicated and hard-working HR, do you still stick on the government website every year to learn about the holidays for the coming year? Workstem’s holiday management system can not only automatically update the latest arrangements of public holidays on the official website of the government, but also help HR to automatically subtract public holidays and weekends when employees ask for leave. It is no longer necessary to count the days by themselves against the calendar.

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